Social media’s death of a thousand cuts

The new rules say it is OK to publicly degrade someone based on a political disagreement. It is OK to publicly question a person’s integrity based solely on differing opinions. Apparently, there are extra points for degrading someone who has chosen public service as their vocation.

We inflict upon our neighbors an ancient Chinese torture every time we hit send on a negative post. It is called lingchi, or death by a thousand cuts.

While lingchi was an actual method of slow slicing to cause a lingering death, the phrase “death by a thousand cuts” has come to be known as a lot of small, bad things happening, none of which are fatal themselves, but which add up to a slow and painful demise. (UsingEnglish.com)

That’s what is happening to civility in our culture. It is dying the death of a thousand Facebook posts and tweets.

Continue reading “Social media’s death of a thousand cuts”

Learn to respect your followers and readers

Now I don’t begrudge anyone from making a living. I paid my bills for more than 20 years as a journalist writing for small town newspapers. But in the newsroom you learn to respect your readers … or you learn to do something else.

I was reading a blog post tonight that gave advice on how to approach social media. The post was a listicle with seven rules we just have to know to survive in the big, bad world of Facebook, Twitter and all the rest.

Maybe you can hear the sarcasm in that last sentence.

I didn’t start reading with a bad attitude. That didn’t develop until I noticed the click-bait design of the post. I had to click next for each of the “seven rules,” which were fairly short and would have been much easier to read on a single page.

Continue reading “Learn to respect your followers and readers”

5 Rules for Guarding Your Tongue and Keyboard

Now, more than any other time in history, there is a level playing field for the exchange of ideas. The rich and powerful no longer hold a monopoly on communications and publishing.

Social media gives Mr. and Mrs. Everyday Citizen something they’ve never had before: A megaphone.

That’s me! Mr. Everyday! If you are reading this, that’s probably you, as well.

Now, more than any other time in history, there is a level playing field for the exchange of ideas. The rich and powerful no longer hold a monopoly on communications and publishing. Anyone can go viral at any time. Hundreds … thousands … hundreds of thousands could be influenced by our words.

But it seems to me that some people have missed part of the new reality — that with power comes responsibility. We are accountable for what we say and post.

Don’t take my word for it. Read Matthew 12:36-37:

“But I tell you that everyone will have to give account on the day of judgment for every empty word they have spoken. For by your words you will be acquitted, and by your words you will be condemned.”

Continue reading “5 Rules for Guarding Your Tongue and Keyboard”

4 Easy Rules for Writing Better Posts

Today we are more likely to type than talk, even if we are using our thumbs quite a bit. So we are writing and being judged by our writing. No, not like your old English teacher judged you, but judged just the same.

We are writing more … much more, in fact.

This is an interesting — and counter intuitive — cultural effect caused by social media. While many critics blast the use of constructions like “ur” or “lol,” the truth is that most people not in school rarely wrote at all 10 years ago, the random note to buy more Cheerios notwithstanding. Cards and postcards were simply signed, and personal letters were a rarity. If you wanted to communicate with someone, you picked up a phone … to call … using your voice.

Continue reading “4 Easy Rules for Writing Better Posts”

3 characteristics of leaders and innovators

Those who look ahead and spend at least part of their time projecting the future become leaders in their field. Everyone else is a follower.

The following quote by Wayne Gretzky is one of my favorites when it comes to my job.

“I skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been.”

It is a simple philosophy that made Gretzky arguably the best hockey player of all time. Everyone else followed the puck, while he got in front of it.Gretzky’s quote is also a great definition for innovation in the marketplace. Those who look ahead and spend at least part of their time projecting the future become leaders in their field. Everyone else is a follower. But it isn’t always easy. Here are three characteristics of leaders and innovators.

1. Work Hard

Being a trend setter isn’t easy — if it was, everyone would be doing it. Leading takes hard work.Consider it this way: Just doing your job takes a full work week. If you want to also become a leader, you are going to have to put in extra hours.It is the simplest, and yet the hardest factor for innovation.In his autobiography, Wayne Gretzky wrote:

“All I wanted to do in the winters was be on the ice. I’d get up in the morning, skate from 7:00 to 8:30, go to school, come home at 3:30, stay on the ice until my mom insisted I come in for dinner, eat in my skates, then go back out until 9:00. On Saturdays and Sundays we’d have huge games, but nighttime became my time. It was a sort of unwritten rule around the neighbourhood that I was to be out there myself or with my dad.”

Continue reading “3 characteristics of leaders and innovators”

The 4 objectives of content in social media marketing

Everybody wants the magic ingredient that will make their social media marketing turn into more customers, more clients and more money.

Everybody wants to find the secret sauce. Everybody wants the magic ingredient that will make their social media marketing turn into more customers, more clients and more money.

But that’s not the way social media marketing works. There is no technique or trick that will instantly give your business thousands of views or generate fan interaction. Instead, there are some fundamental rules for building an audience and converting that audience into customers.

The most basic of these fundamentals is this: Content is King.

Content is the basic building block of all social media. While some social media marketers like to debate the definition of content, I think it is easiest to say content is anything that you share on your social media.

Continue reading “The 4 objectives of content in social media marketing”